Review: Shrimp King salts from Dennerle

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With shrimp continuing to increase their presence across the globe, and with an ardent fanbase prepared to spend what they need to keep them happy, it's a surprise that a product as core as shrimp salts didn't become popular sooner, says Nathan Hill.

There are three distinct salts in the Dennerle range, each corresponding to a different 'clan' of shrimp: Bee, Sulawesi and 'generic'. Unsurprisingly, despite the rather cavalier attitude of many buyers and sellers, it turns out that shrimp from different regions require different water chemistries too. 

The generic salt is aimed at Neocaridina species of shrimp, including Sakura and White pearl types, as well as Caridina Tiger shrimp. A standard dose creates a pH of around 7.0 to 7.5, with a total hardness of 6–8°H. The Bee salt, aimed at Crystal and Bumblebee types, creates a softer, more acidic balance, with a pH around 6.0 to 6.5, and a hardness down around 5°H. The Sulawesi salt, designed for those alkalophile (yet not really that hardwater) crustaceans lifts the pH to around 7.8 to 8.5, with a corresponding hardness of 6 to 7°H. 

Now I know what you’re thinking. How does a measure of salt alter your tapwater to a pH of 6.5, or whatever? Well, it doesn’t. This stuff is designed to go into RO water. If you’re adding to water from any other source, then you’ll need to factor in the existing pH and hardness to get things just right. You can’t just tip a load into your existing hardwater supply and expect it to soften things down and drop the pH. 

Dosage in RO works out at one measure (approx. 6g) from the supplied spoon into 20 litres of water. The tubs I have are 200g each, meaning that they’ll treat over 1,300 l. You mix the salt into a container of water away from the main tank and then add it along with a water change refill. Any bits of residue are apparently also safe and should be added. 

As well as bolstering GH and KH, there are other, unspecified ingredients involved, with the packaging claiming 'valuable minerals, trace elements (including iodine) and vitamins,' so it’s not a product that can be compared like-for-like with a bog-standard off-the-shelf GH/KH additive. 

Verdict

Well, this makes shrimping a whole lot easier. I just wish I’d had access to these when I’d first started my shrimp exploits. 

Ease of use:

4/5

Features:

3/5

Value for money:

3/5

Overall score:

3/5

Price:

Around £12.39 for 200g.

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