Jellyfish shut down nuclear power station

d6751582-9950-400b-9f97-db46c4bbd71a

Editor's Picks
Features Post
The brightest pupils
04 October 2021
Features Post
Dealing with egg ‘fungus’
04 October 2021
Features Post
Rathbun’s tetra in the wild
13 September 2021
Fishkeeping News Post
Report: 2021 BKKS National Koi Show results
13 September 2021
Features Post
The World's forgotten fishes
16 August 2021


Large swarms of jellyfish have caused both reactors at Torness nuclear power station to be shut down.

The reactors were shut down on Tuesday (June 28), after unusually high numbers of the creatures blocked filters designed to prevent marine life being sucked into their cooling system.

The reason for the abnormally high densities of jellyfish is unknown, but some experts believe it may be due to higher than normal temperatures in the North Sea for the time of year.

EDF Energy, the plant's operator, said that there was no danger to the public and the shutdown was a precautionary measure. It is hoped the station will be operational again by next week.

Earlier this month a Grey seal became trapped in the cooling chamber at Hinkley Point B power station in Somerset while chasing fish inside. After five days the seal had been unable to find its own way out, so EDF staff and the RSPCA had to construct a special cradle from scaffold and netting to catch and remove the seal which was later released, safe and well, at sea.

Why not take out a subscription to Practical Fishkeeping magazine? Check out our latest subscription offer.