You can have too many arowana!

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It certainly seems that's the case in Singapore at the moment anyway, as fish farms are having to slash the prices of these prized tropicals by as much as 50%.

A report by the Singapore-based 'my paper', says that an oversupply of the so-called dragonfish from Malaysia since March last year has led to a drop in sales at Singapore fish farms of 30%.

Farming these expensive fish is big business and Singapore has several specialist farms that produce them for the trade.

According to the report, most of the arowanas imported from Malaysia are crossbreeds, so some fish farms are bucking the trend by concentrating only on locally-bred high quality purebred arowana, for which customers are still happy to pay more.

One trader said he had sold 150 Highback golden arowanas so far this year, compared to 100 last year. Each was sold for between $500 and $900 (£250-£450).

He also said that prices for more costly varieties like the Golden-head crossback, that can cost $2,500-$6,000 (£1,245-£2,988) have actually gone up by 15%.

But a drop in the prices of your average arowana is good news for some, as these fish are seen as symbols of good luck and wealth in areas influenced by Chinese culture. As such, some people like to collect them.

One such collector, Richard Goh (52) has several hundred of the fish in his collection. "Because of the reduced prices, I can buy 10 instead of three now. Ten arowanas will certainly bring more luck than three arowanas," he said.

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