Two-headed turtle will go on public display

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A turtle with two heads is to go on display at a zoo in Texas in the U.S. today.

Christened Thelma and Louise, the Texas cooter (Pseudemys texana) is said to be thriving since it hatched on June 18 at San Antonio Zoo.

It will go on display at the zoo's Friedrich Aquarium.

Craig Pelke, Curator of Reptiles, Amphibians, and Aquatics, says that while this is uncommon, it is not unheard of in both the wild and captive populations. Two-headed (bicephalic) animals are actually twins that did not separate, resulting in two (or more) heads on one animal. Bicephaly occurs most commonly with snakes and turtles.

"At this time, Thelma and Louise are doing well on exhibit and eating with both heads," Pelke said.

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