Show us your teeth!

764586e4-bed5-4fba-83b0-4f52bc1a65e8

Editor's Picks
Features Post
The brightest pupils
04 October 2021
Features Post
Dealing with egg ‘fungus’
04 October 2021
Features Post
Rathbun’s tetra in the wild
13 September 2021
Fishkeeping News Post
Report: 2021 BKKS National Koi Show results
13 September 2021
Features Post
The World's forgotten fishes
16 August 2021

These are the teeth of a Goliath tigerfish, Hydrocynus goliath - one of the most fearsome of all predatory fish.

This African characin has 32 incredibly sharp teeth which are similar in size to those of a Great white shark. It inhabits large lakes and rivers and is found in the Congo River basin, Lualaba River, Lake Upemba, and Lake Tanganyika. It's a highly aggressive species with a body built for speed, and it's an ambush predator, hunting in groups.

This monster fish was caught by British angler Jeremy Wade during a fishing expedition in the Congo River in Africa. It weighed more than 100lbs and almost 5ft long. It was filmed during the making of ITV's River Monsters. Wade spent more than a week trying to catch the fish which was returned to the river soon afterwards.

He told the Daily Mail: "It has an extremely powerful bite and has been known to consume prey the same size as itself, attack people and take pieces out of crocodiles! It is a very dangerous fish to handle. If you aren't careful it could easily take your finger off or worse."

Believe it or not, some people keep these in the aquarium! In fact, we know of a couple of shops that were offering juveniles for sale recently, albeit with quite a large price tag. Obviously it eventually needs an enormous species tank with excellent filtration, as it's sensitive to any sort of pollution – and a secure lid as it tends to be a little on the nervous side in the aquarium and inclined to jump. Definitely not one for hand-feeding! And let's face it, would you really want to do any sort of tank maintenance with one of these swimming about?

Maybe it's a fish that's more suited to a public aquarium that can provide the space that this species – with a potential size of 133cm/4.5ft or more - will require.

Check out the video below to see those gnashers in action!