Lost a fish? Why not dry it out and sell it?

01aac644-cbbf-4806-8c49-110ec57228b2

Editor's Picks
 A perfect place for your Fighter to rest his little fins — the Betta Bed Leaf Hammock.
Gear Post
Review: Betta Bed Leaf Hammock
21 November 2017
 Just look at that little face... No wonder then, that so many fishkeepers find these little puffers so hard to resist.
Features Post
Join the puffer fish fan club!
28 September 2017
 Special care needs to be taken when catching Pictus catfish and other species with spines.
Features Post
Travels with your fish
03 August 2017

Advertised as 'Rare preserved fish Discus and Catfish' it seems that one entrepreneurial seller has taken it on himself to fill that long empty niche in the market for dessicated aquarium fish corpses.

I was kind of hoping that this was a joke when I first saw it, but it appears genuine enough.

At a bargain starting price of just 99p (plus £3 for postage) it appears that you too can now possess your very own mummified aquarium livestock (deadstock?), ideal for those who maybe don’t wish to go through the rigours of water changes, but instead prefer to sellotape decaying fish inside the glass for a similar effect.

Alternatively, they could make the ideal purchase if you happen to have relatives or friends who like to experiment in alternative medicines. Perhaps you know someone who likes to play with powdered dead things as a cure for baldness, or to increase virility*, who would love a bundle like this.

Unfortunately, exact species and variety identification may be tricky, given the nature of decay. The preservation method isn’t stipulated, but the images of the fish suggest that formaldehyde isn’t being used.

So, if purchasing dead fish of unknown origin is your thing, then hasten to this link where you might bag yourself a bargain. For what it’s worth, I’ll not be placing a bid myself.

*Disclaimer — dried, dead Discus and loricariids are not known to cure baldness or increase virility. In fact, consuming them is likely to make you very, very ill, so don’t do it.

Why not take out a subscription to Practical Fishkeeping magazine? See our latest subscription offer.