Gulf of Aqaba corals are resistant to global warming

cec9165b-295b-4983-ab1d-1e30db39065a

Editor's Picks
 A perfect place for your Fighter to rest his little fins — the Betta Bed Leaf Hammock.
Gear Post
Review: Betta Bed Leaf Hammock
21 November 2017
 Just look at that little face... No wonder then, that so many fishkeepers find these little puffers so hard to resist.
Features Post
Join the puffer fish fan club!
28 September 2017
 Special care needs to be taken when catching Pictus catfish and other species with spines.
Features Post
Travels with your fish
03 August 2017


Coral bleaching is unlikely to affect reefs in the northern Red Sea as water temperatures rise, according to new research.

While the Gulf of Aqaba (Eilat) is still seeing the rise in temperature that causes coral bleaching and subsequent die-offs else where, scientists from the Hebrew University and Bar-Ilan University say that the corals in that region are resistant, making the area a unique refuge for coral reefs in the warming oceans.  

The reason for this is a "warm-water barrier" that exists in Bal el Mandeb in the southern Red Sea, which allows only heat-tolerant genotypes of corals to enter the Red Sea from the Gulf of Aden. The corals that make it through this thermal barrier have to be able to tolerate temperatures of up to 32°C/89.5°F.

Scientists explain that the Gulf of Aqaba is currently at 27°C/81°F and estimate that corals there will be unaffected for at least a century, giving us more time to find ways of resolving the issue.

The area is rich in coral and other marine biodiversity and is one of the world's premier sites for diving.

The report, A Coral Reef Refuge in the Red Sea, is published in the journal Global Change Biology.

Why not take out a subscription to Practical Fishkeeping magazine? See our latest subscription offer.

Don't forget that PFK is now available to download on the iPad.