GM fish bad for environment, say scientists

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A new study by scientists at Purdue University suggests that some GM fish have a competitive advantage in reproduction over their non-modified counterparts.

Professor Rick Howard told Medical News Today: "Ours is the first demonstration that genetically modified fish will be bigger and have more success at attracting mates, they may also produce offspring that are less likely to survive to adulthood. If this occurs, as generations pass, a population could dwindle in size and, potentially disappear entirely."

The paper published in the Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) looked at transgenic Medaka, Oryzias latipes, and found that GM males were 83% heavier and survival rates lower in offspring.